From Camille Ammerman , Winnipeg, MB, Canada

I have collected items which appeared primarily in the "Daily State Journal" of Parkersburg W. Va., in the mid-late 1880s. Often a column appeared under the heading "River News". As I photocopied the items from the microfilmed newspapers, the items are verbatim, spelling warts and all.

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LDS DOCUMENTS, PART 1
1865 - 1868

Source: LDS Microfilm No. 0215305, Vol. 1, No. 1 (23 Sep 1865) - Vol. 3, No. 25 (7 May 1868), "The West Virginia Weekly Times", Parkersburg, Wood county W. Va. (Note: Not all issues of the newspapers were available for inclusion in the LDS microfilms of newspapers).

Issue dated Saturday, 25 June 1865:
"River Items. Weather cloudy and cool, river 4 feet 6 inches and on a stand. Business on the wharf continues brisk. The 'Ohio' left yesterday evening with a fair trip of freight and passengers. The 'Wild Wagoner', Capt. (Henry H.) Drown, passed up last night for Wheeling with a moderate trip; owing to low water and fog, the boatmen experience considerable trouble in making their regular time. Our old friend, Capt. Cole, has commenced building a wharf on the Belpre side, where he has purchased a lot of 5 acres. We wish him success in his new enterprise. The 'Kate Henderson' went out with a moderate trip of freight and passengers; the little 'Falcon' appears to be doing a fair amount of business; she is very regular in her arrivals and departures; by the by, our wharf boatmen are getting along quite smoothly - they are doing a lively business, they keep things moving."


Source: LDS Microfilm No. 0215305, Vol. 1, No. 1 (23 Sep 1865) - Vol. 3, No. 25 (7 May 1868), "The West Virginia Weekly Times", Parkersburg, Wood county W. Va.

Issue dated Saturday, 10 March 1866:

"We learn that the stock of the new bridge over the Kanawha is now pledged, and that the work will be commenced this season. This is much needed as a short route to the country and a thing good and sufficient ground for the removal of the old bridge, and the opening of the city above for the use of a marine railway and ship yard.

"There have been within the past two weeks several contracts made for the building of boats at our ship yard and some other, for (illegible) and barges. It will be a busy time at the yard the coming season. We think the ground from the bridge, as it now is, will be generally occupied, up to the proposed bridge."

Issue dated Saturday, 9 June 1866:
"The following note explains itself fully. - Ed.
"Steamer '

', Near Parkersburg, June 6, 1866}
"Mr. Spicer, Mr. Dear Sir. - It becomes my painful duty to inform you of the sad end of your son, John W. Spicer. He had shipped as deck hand on the steamer 'Edinburg' Saturday morning at Cincinnati; in unloading some hogsheads of tobacco, a loose ended hoop caught in a glove he was wearing and threw him over forward of the hogshead which was rolling down the stage and rolled on his head. He did not seem to be so terribly injured at first, walked up town with one of the hands to see a doctor. He saw Dr. Tate and had his face dressed.

"We had a cot fixed up for him in the Texas hall, the coolest and most quiet place on the boat. We then had another Dr. Miller called, who said his recovery was doubtful. I wanted to leave him at the Hospital thinking he might receive better treatment than we could give him on the boat, but Dr. Miller advised me to take him home, as it was his (your son's) most urgent request; he said his case was of such a nature that little could be done more than to make him as comfortable as possible by good nursing. We had Dr. Miller call again in the evening and carried out his prescriptions, and never left him unattended day or night for one moment. We also had a Dr. White to see him at Racine, O.; he said we were doing the best that could be done for him, but that he could not recover. When near Murraysville this afternoon, at 18 minutes past 2 o'clock he breathed his last.

"While consoling with your terrible bereavement, I hope it will be some consolation with yourself and family, to know that all that could be done for his comfort was done.

"He was well acquainted with our Mate's brother, and was kindly treated by the Mate and I believe, every one on board.

"At any time convenient call and see us, we would be glad to see you. Sadly and respectfully, Your Friend, G. W. Thompson, Clerk."

Issue dated Saturday, 10 March 1866:

"We learn that the stock of the new bridge over the Kanawha is now pledged, and that the work will be commenced this season. This is much needed as a short route to the country and a thing good and sufficient ground for the removal of the old bridge, and the opening of the city above for the use of a marine railway and ship yard.

"There have been within the past two weeks several contracts made for the building of boats at our ship yard and some other, for (illegible) and barges. It will be a busy time at the yard the coming season. We think the ground from the bridge, as it now is, will be generally occupied, up to the proposed bridge."

Issue dated Saturday, 3 November 1866:
"The new ferry boat for Mr. Lease, for the Ferry across the river, will be launched in a few days. The machinery is all ready, with two as fine bailers as we have seen. It is 100 feet long, 30 feet beam, and with a power that will stem any current. Mr. Parsons is the builder."

"Capt. Spencer has his steamer, the 'Silver Cloud', nearly completed, built by Mr. Parsons. It is intended for the Kanawha trade and will be valuable for that purpose. It is compact, yet furnishes room accommodation for passengers."

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Source: LDS Microfilm No. 0215305, Vol. 1, No. 1 (23 Sep 1865) - Vol. 3, No. 25 (7 May 1868), "The West Virginia Weekly Times", Parkersburg, Wood county W. Va.

Issue dated Saturday, 22 June 1867:
"Drowned. The decomposed body of a man supposed to be George Smith, an engineer and sawyer, from papers on his person, was fished out of the Little Kanawha river near Wirt Court House one day last week. He had apparently fallen overboard from a steamer during a rise in the river in the Winter or Spring."

Issue dated Saturday, 3 August 1867:
"Since the river is so low, the lively pulsation of trade on our wharf has ceased. It is but seldom now that we hear the inspiring whistle of a well laden steamer. Where everything seemed lively before, it now looks quiet, almost dead. Our Ohio river is in great need of improvements. We hear a good deal of talking about it; we wish we could see some stout shoulders join and push the contemplated improvements to a beginning. If it is not done soon, at least in 50 years, our Little Kanawha Navigation Company might overtake the Ohio improvers, as they seem to be earnestly intending to Commence operations at the very moment the water in the Little Kanawha River should show signs of an utter exhaustion, or in other words, as soon as no water shall be visible at Shacktown. Ohio men! hurry; else our Kanawha men will take your laurels away. After a few years, if you don't look out, they will be ahead of you."

Issue dated Saturday, 19 October 1867:
"The Wharf - A visit to this point at present is not very pleasing to those who like to see business brisk. The low water in the Ohio keeps away nearly all the boats of any size, and every thing on the wharf looks flat, stale and unprofitable. We hope the day is approaching when a rise will set business once more afloat."

"Arrival and Departure - A little dinky called the 'Dew Drop' from Parkersburg arrived at the wharf last evening. she is reported to have come party of the way by land.

"A flat boat is advertised to leave for Gallipolis this morning. Who says navigation has not been renewed? - 'Wheeling Intelligencer'."


Source: LDS Microfilm No. 0215305, Vol. 1, No. 1 (23 Sep 1865) - Vol. 3, No. 25 (7 May 1868), "The West Virginia Weekly Times", Parkersburg, Wood county W. Va.

Issue dated Saturday, 11 January 1868:
"Terrible Accident. Steamer 'Harry Dean' Exploded. January 4th, 1868. The Steamer 'Harry Dean' exploded and burned at 10 o'clock this morning two miles below Gallipolis - Capt. Hos... (illegible) of Wheeling and Capt. (R.) P. M. Biggs, of Ashland, were drowned. Two men, names unknown, were burned to death. The following are slightly injured: Thos. Sayer; H. Booth and Son; Leander Chapin; David Hart; John Marvin; John Chamberlain, --- Crane, engineer; John Livesay. The following were seriously injured: Capt. (Hiram) Burch, leg, neck and shoulder burned, but not dangerously; John Harvey, arm broken and badly burned, probably fatal; --- Burns, of Watertown, leg broken and burned seriously; F. Ryan, badly burned; G. Muncie, badly cut in shoulder; James Farris, killed. The following are safe: Arthur Chapin, Murry Barber, Lewis Farris, James Allen, Henry Chapin, Julia Barber. All the ladies and children aboard are safe. They are all on board the steamer 'Edinburg', which left here at 12 o'clock. Everything on board a total loss.
(Note: Capt. George W. Norton, Wheeling, formerly of the ALVIN ADAMS was reading in the salon and was also killed - Dave)

"Several of our citizens, Messrs. Longmoor, Welles, Brandt & Mountz, having a large quantity of refined oil aboard, are heavy losers.

"It is not yet ascertained what caused the terrible catastrophe.

"Latest. The steamer 'Harry Dean' exploded at 10 1/2 a.m., in the bend two miles below Gallipolis. The 'Bulletin' reporter has just returned from the wreck, and reports the following casualties:

"Capt. Sayre, commanding boat, slightly wounded; Capt. (John K?)Booth and his son, slightly wounded; Capt. (Hiram) Burch, seriously; First Engineer Crane, slight; John Haines, fireman, fatally, arm broken and leg mutilated. The cook and second steward are missing. The probabilities are that not more than five were killed outright. The 'Edinburgh' brought some of the wounded to Gallipolis at 12 m.

"Captain Burch, of Marietta, the pilot on watch at the time, although seriously wounded, kept his post at the wheel and held the boat until she struck the Virginia shore.

"The 'Dean' had on board two hundred and fifty barrels of oil, and it caught fire, and the boat is now burning to the water's edge. Books and papers lost. Nothing saved from the boat. J. L. Vance.

"Note: - The 'Dean' was a fine stern wheel freight and passenger packet, and her loss is disastrous to her officers, who recover no insurance from loss by explosion, and the trade, and keenly felt by those whose relatives and friends are lost. She generally had a full passenger list on her down trip. In November last, by the inspector for the board of Underwriters, the 'Dean' was valued at $15,000 and insured, we learn, for $12,000.

"The Ohio No. 3 passed Parkersburg yesterday with sixteen of the wounded for Marietta."

Issue dated Thursday, 23 April 1868:
"Accidental Shooting Affair. The Steward of the steamer 'Chas. Bowen' came ashore this morning to purchase some ice, and on getting out of the yawl, a pistol in his pocket was accidentally discharged, the contents lodging in his leg. The unfortunate man withdrew the innocent (?) weapon from his pocket and buried it into the mud, on the shore, and put back to the boat in a hurry. We could not ascertain his name."

"The superb and swift steamer 'J. N. McCullough', Capt. Geo. Moore, will leave the wharf this afternoon at 2 o'clock for Pittsburgh and intermediate ports. With our genial friend Dan. Moore in the office, passengers may rely upon proper care and attention. Shippers have always found business entrusted to the Moore brothers in safe hands and seldom miss connections. Prices for freight and passengers at regular reduced rates."

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